uninstall Windows Updates


Removing via command line

Windows Updates can be removed rather easily via the command line with wusa.exe, the Windows Update Standalone Installer.

Using the wusa.exe command, we can uninstall the update KB1212121 quietly and prompt the user for a restart with the following command:

C:\Windows\System32\wusa.exe /quiet /uninstall /kb:1212121 /promptrestart
1
C:\Windows\System32\wusa.exe /quiet /uninstall /kb:1212121 /promptrestart

Uninstall with wsua command

Uninstall with wsua command

Using PsExec (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897553.aspx), we can do the same thing to remote PC’s. In the case of remote PC’s, you may want to include the /warnrestart switch to ensure the user is warned before a reboot happens:

psexec.exe \\computername C:\Windows\System32\wusa.exe /quiet /uninstall /kb:1212121 /warnrestart:600
1
psexec.exe \\computername C:\Windows\System32\wusa.exe /quiet /uninstall /kb:1212121 /warnrestart:600

Uninstalling via Startup/Shutdown script

If you need to remove an update across a larger group of computers that are part of an Active Directory domain, you can uninstall the update as part of a startup or shutdown script.

In the Group Policy Management Console, open the GPO that will contain the script and go to Computer Configuration > Policies > Windows Settings > Scripts (Startup/Shutdown).

Startup-Shutdown scripts

Startup/Shutdown scripts

Click Add and then Browse. This will open the GPO in the Sysvol share for you to create the batch file.

Add Shutdown script

Add Shutdown script

Personally, I like to use Shutdown scripts when I need to remove an update en masse. Typically, updates require a reboot after removal. By using a Shutdown script, the script can run at the next system shutdown/reboot event and the update removal process gets the reboot it needs. By using a Startup script, you may end up needing two reboots to remove the update: one reboot so that the script runs at the next system start and a possible second reboot if the update removal process requires it.

For the script, I use:

C:\Windows\System32\wusa.exe /uninstall /kb:1212121 /quiet /norestart /log
1
C:\Windows\System32\wusa.exe /uninstall /kb:1212121 /quiet /norestart /log

Script to uninstall an update

Script to uninstall an update

By adding the optional, /log, you can go into the Setup Event Log and check that your update was removed.

Event Log- Windows update was successfully uninstalled

Event Log- Windows update was successfully uninstalled

Advertisements

Windows Security Log Events

EventID Finder

System Admin free Tools URL

Manually remove all printer drivers


Method 1 (Try First) – Force reinstall of a single corrupt driver

 

  1. Find your driver name. (ex.“HP LaserJet 4050 Series PCL6”)
  2. Remove all printers using the driver from step 1
  3. Open Regedit. Remove the folder that matches the printer driver name under the following folder.
    (on 32 bit(x86) computers)
    “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Environments\Windows NT x86\Drivers\Version-3”
    (on 64 bit(x64) computers)
    “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Environments\Windows x64\Drivers\Version-3”
  4. Restart the print spooler service
  5. Reinstall the printers you removed. Windows should download the correct version of the driver and the printer should now work

Method 2 (Last Resort) – Remove All printer drivers

  1. Reboot into safemode (you will need the bitlocker key if the machine is encrypted). Log in as Administrator
  2. Remove the contents of the following folder
    (on 32 bit(x86) computers)
    “C:\Windows\System32\spool\drivers\W32X86”
    (on 64 bit(x64) computers)
    “C:\Windows\System32\spool\drivers\x64”
  3. Open regedit. Remove all the folders under
    (on 32 bit(x86) computers)
    “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Environments\Windows NT x86\Drivers\Version-3”
    (on 64 bit(x64) computers)
    “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Environments\Windows x64\Drivers\Version-3”
  4. Reboot into normal mode and log in as the user. GPO should reinstall the department printers and the proper drivers.
  5. Verify All printers

Export Windows Registry File


Registry is very Delicate and at the same time very very important part of computer, whenever you try to modify registry:

-Be very much precise and very much accurate

-Take extra care as very small mistake by you which you wouldn’t even remember may lead to serious problem.

It is strongly recommended to Export or save your registry entries before modifying it.

What to do?
-Just Follow these simple steps (accurately)

1) Open Registry editor
Start -> Run -> Regedit -> Enter (allow if asks for permission)

Run

2) In Menu bar Go to:
File -> Export

Export Registry

3) In File name, give name of the registry file(which will remind you its use)

4) Under Export Range, do one of the following:
– To back up the entire registry, click All (done once for taking entire backup)
– To back up only a particular branch of the registry tree, click Selected branch and enter the name of the branch you want to export (By Default, the branch selected by you in registry window will reflect here)

Export Range

5) Click Save

Warning

Warning: Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall the operating system. We cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.

How to import a Registry key?
– In Windows Explorer, double-click the Saved Registry file(.reg extension)
– This will import the file into the computer’s registry

%d bloggers like this: